Sue a Company in China
Sue a Company in China

WhatsApp/WeChat Messages as Evidence to Chinese Courts?

International business partners are getting increasingly accustomed to using WhatsApp or WeChat to reach an agreement, send orders, modify transaction conditions and confirm performance.

A One Minute Guide on Litigation in China or in Your Own Country

When you decide to sue a Chinese company, where will you file the lawsuit? China or your own country, provided that both have jurisdiction over your case?

Are NNN Agreement Enforceable in China?

If you believe that the Chinese company does not comply with the NNN agreement, you may resolve the dispute via arbitration outside of China and enforce the arbitral award in China.

How Do I Take Legal Action Against a Chinese Company?

You need to determine where you are going to sue, and what law is applicable to your case. If you are planning to file a lawsuit in China, then we have prepared 8 tips for you in this article to help you evaluate your potential legal action.

Sue a Company in China: How Do Chinese Judges Treat Evidence?

What evidence should you prepare? Documentary evidence (physical documents), electronic documents, and recordings are all necessary in this regard.

Debt Collections in China: Enforce Your US Judgment in China and You Will Have a Surprise!

Good news for the creditors with a US judgment! Now, American civil/commercial judgments are highly likely to be recognized and enforced in China.

What Does It Mean if My Chinese Supplier Is a Dishonest Judgment Debtor?

You should perform verification or due diligence on a Chinese supplier to find out whether he/it has the capability to perform contracts before you make a contract with the supplier. You can ask us for free verification service.

How Do I Get a Refund of My Deposit or Prepayment From a Chinese Company?

There are three things you can do to get your deposit or advance payment back from a defaulting or fraudulent Chinese company: (1) negotiate a refund, (2) claim liquidated damages, or (3) terminate the contract or order.

How to Sue a Supplier in China: Five Things You Have to Know

There are five things you need to do to get ready: 1) find the legal Chinese name of the Chinese company, 2) decide whether to sue in China, 3) if yes, hire a local Chinese lawyer, 4) evaluate the costs and benefits of litigation, and 5) prepare in advance evidence that Chinese courts would like.

Arbitration or Litigation in China: Pros & Cons

If you have a dispute with a Chinese company, would you choose litigation or arbitration in China? Perhaps you should first understand the advantages and disadvantages of litigation and arbitration in China.

Sue a Company in China: What Evidence Strategy Should You Adopt in a Chinese Court?

You should prepare sufficient documentary evidence prior to filing a lawsuit, preferably provided or presented by the other party. In some cases, you can also rely on the court to collect evidence for you.

Suing in China vs Suing in Other Countries: Pros and Cons

When your Chinese suppliers or distributors defraud or default, where will you file the lawsuit? China or somewhere else (eg. the place of your domicile), provided that both have jurisdiction over your case? To answer these questions, we need to compare the litigation in China with that in other countries.

Can I Claim Compensation for the Loss That I Compensate My Customers All Caused by Chinese Supplier’s Fraud or Breach of Contract?

You should state in your contract such loss may be incurred in advance. As such, at least you should inform the supplier of such loss in the course of execution of the contract and seek his/her consent.

Can I Sue the Chinese Supplier Only With Emails Instead of a Written Contract?

Chinese courts prefer to accept written contracts with the parties’ signature.
However, with certain preparations made, contracts and orders confirmed by emails may still be accepted by Chinese courts.

Sue a Company in China: Who Can Give Me a Lawyer-Network in China?

You are very likely not to file a lawsuit with a court in Beijing or Shanghai, but in a city with many factories, an airport, or a seaport hundreds of kilometers or thousands of kilometers away. It means that the elite lawyers gathered in Beijing and Shanghai may not be able to help you any better.